Project Description

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Benjamin Chin-Yee

RESEARCH AREAS:

  • Philosophy of Medicine

  • Clinical Epistemology

  • Philosophy of Technology

  • Medical Ethics

CONTACT:

BENJAMIN CHIN-YEE

Clinical Fellow, Division of Hematology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry;
Postdoctoral Member, Rotman Institute of Philosophy, Western University

Dr. Benjamin Chin-Yee is a clinical fellow in the Division of Hematology and postdoctoral member at the Rotman Institute of Philosophy at Western University. He is a specialist in internal medicine and Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. He completed his internal medicine residency at University of Toronto, where he also received his MD and MA in the history and philosophy of science. Prior to this, he studied biology at McGill University and history and philosophy of science at the University of Cambridge.

Dr. Chin-Yee’s interdisciplinary research spans a range of fields, from bioethics to the history and philosophy of medicine. Areas of interest include the impact of technology on the patient-physician relationship and how to integrate evidence and values to improve clinical decision-making. He was the recent recipient of an AMS Healthcare Fellowship in Compassion and AI study the impact of genomics and AI on compassionate care and health equity in oncology.

Dr. Chin-Yee’s philosophical research focuses on the uses of big data, genomics and AI in clinical practice. He is interested in the impact of these novel technologies on clinical epistemology and the ethics of the clinician-patient relationship. His clinical research focuses on the role of genomic biomarkers for prognostication in hematology-oncology and use of these data in clinical decision-making. He is currently conducting a study examining the impact of genomics and AI on health equity and compassionate care in oncology.

Chin-Yee B. Malignant by Vinay Prasad: Oncology’s leading gadfly. Philosophy of Medicine 2021;2(1):1-7. https://philmed.pitt.edu/philmed/article/view/44/14

Wamsley D, Chin-Yee B. COVID-19, digital health technology and the politics of the unprecedented. Big Data & Society 2021;8(1):1-6. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/20539517211019441

Chin-Yee B, Diaz P, Bryden P, Soklaridis S, Kuper A. From hermeneutics to heteroglossia: “The patient’s view” revisited. BMJ Medical Humanities 2020;46:464-473. https://mh.bmj.com/content/46/4/464.long

Thomas A, Kuper A, Chin-Yee B, Park M. What is ‘shared’ in shared decision making? Philosophical reflections on power and agency. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2020;26:409-418. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jep.13370

Chin-Yee B, Upshur REG. Three problems with big data and artificial intelligence in medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 2019;62(2):237-256. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/728485

Chin-Yee B, Upshur REG. “The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Clinical Judgement: A Briefing Document” AMS Healthcare. 2019 Jan. https://www.ams-inc.on.ca/resource/the-imapct-of-ai-on-clinical-judgment/

Chin-Yee B, Upshur REG. Clinical judgement in the era of big data and predictive analytics. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2018;24(3):638-645. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jep.12852

Chin-Yee B, Messinger A, Young LT. Three visions of doctoring: A Gadamerian dialogue. Advances in Health Sciences Education 2018;24(2):403–412. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10459-018-9824-3

Chin-Yee B. The new medical model: why medicine needs philosophy. Canadian Medical Association Journal 2017;189(26):896. https://www.cmaj.ca/content/189/26/E896

Chin-Yee BH, Upshur REG. Re-evaluating concepts of biological function in clinical medicine: Towards a new naturalistic theory of disease. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2017;38(4):245-264. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11017-017-9410-3

Messinger A, Chin-Yee BH. I and thou: Learning the ‘human’ side of medicine. BMJ Medical Humanities 2016; 42:184–5. https://mh.bmj.com/content/42/3/184.long

Chin-Yee BH, Upshur REG. Historical thinking in clinical medicine: Lessons from R.G. Collingwood’s philosophy of history. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2015; 21:448–54. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jep.12344

Chin-Yee BH. Underdetermination in evidence-based medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice2014; 20:921-7. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jep.12258

See CV for full list of publications.

Project Title: Exploring the impact of genomics and AI on health equity and compassionate care in oncology

Project Page: https://www.ams-inc.on.ca/project/exploring-the-impact-of-genomics-and-ai-on-health-equity-and-compassionate-care-in-oncology/

Primary Investigator: Dr. Benjamin Chin-Yee

Other Project Members: Dr. Alejandro Lazo-Langner, Dr. Bekim Sadijovic, Mr. Paul Istasy, Dr. Ross Upshur

Brief Description: Clinical decision-making in hematology and oncology is increasingly driven by genomic biomarkers with research focusing on the development of diagnostic and prognostic algorithms to guide patient management. This project explores the impact of genomics and AI on equity and compassionate care in oncology. Using a large cancer database, we are examining potential disparities arising from the application of genomics and machine learning to predict clinical outcomes. We are also conducting scoping reviews of the literature to better understand how to mitigate potential disparities and integrate digital technologies into compassionate cancer care.


Project Title: Dynamic Epigenomic and Proteomic Profiling in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Primary Investigators: Dr. Benjamin Chin-Yee; Dr. Anargyros Xenocostas

Other Project Members: Dr. Alejandro Lazo-Langner; Dr. Shun-Cheng Li; Dr. Bekim Sadikovic; Dr. Alejandro Garcia-Horton; Dr. Eri Iida

Brief Description: The goal of this project is to establish epigenomic, genomic and proteomic profiles in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The aim is to identify molecular drivers of disease progression, which may serve as prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets. The project is funded by an LRCP Catalyst Grant.

Lecturer, “Ethics and Medical Technology,” Postgraduate Academic Half Day. Departments of Medicine and Surgery, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University (2021-ongoing)

Lecturer, “Epistemology,” Professional Competencies. MD Program, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University (2019-ongoing)

Lecturer, “Research Methods in the Humanities and Social Sciences,” Postgraduate Academic Half Day.Department of Medicine, University of Toronto (2018-ongoing)

Guest Lecturer, “Hermeneutics,” Social Theory Graduate Seminar, The Wilson Center for Research in Education, University of Toronto (2020).

Seminar Leader, Ethics & Professionalism. MD Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (2019-2020)