Justin Donhauser

Putting Environmental Philosophy to Work: Interview with Justin Donhauser

Justin Donhauser joined the Rotman Institute as postdoctoral fellow this fall. He specializes in socially-relevant philosophy of science — focusing on clarifying how model-based ecological and climate-science methods can aid in political, ethical, and resource management decisions. Justin trained as a PhD fellow of the National Science Foundation endowed Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange (ERIE-IGERT) […]

Video Posting — Andrew Light: What Happened in Paris? How Differentiation Evolved to Create a Global Climate Agreement.

Last Friday, Andrew Light delivered the 2016 Rotman Lecture, titled, What Happened in Paris? How Differentiation Evolved to Create a Global Climate Agreement. Dr. Light is a professor at George Mason University, Director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy, Senior Fellow at the World Resources Institute, and a former Senior Climate Change Adviser […]

Andrew Light and the Paris Agreement

By Justin Donhauser (Rotman Institute of Philosophy) At a conference of environmental ethicists some years ago, I somewhat nervously introduced myself to J. Baird Callicott—a central figure in environmental ethics and hero to many working in environmental philosophy and science. After some discussion about his work, and mine, and the future of environmental philosophy, Callicott […]

Video Posting — Evan Fraser: Food in 2050: The Challenge of Feeding 9 Billion

Evan Fraser, of the University of Guelph, delivered a lecture on February 25, 2016 entitled, Food in 2050: The Challenge of Feeding 9 Billion. Video of this lecture has been posted on the Rotman Institute of Philosophy YouTube channel. Abstract: Creating food systems capable of sustainably, equitably, and nutritiously feeding 9 billion people while dealing […]

#TBT Video Postings — Doing Science in the Dark and Clarity before Consensus

Leonard Smith and Erica Thompson, of the London School of Economics, delivered a lecture on October 29, 2014 entitled, Doing Science in the Dark: The Challenges of Climate-Like Science. This lecture was presented at the Central Library as part of the 2014 Library Speaker Series, co-sponsored with the London Public Library. Video of this lecture […]

Wendy Parker, et al. Knowledge and Models in Climate Sciecne, Looking forward in light of what we’ve learned

    Wendy Parker (Durham University, Department of Philosophy)   Title: Looking forward in light of what we’ve learned      

Reto Knutti: Mysterious Models and Enigmatic Ensembles

  Mysterious Models and Enigmatic Ensembles Reto Knutti (ETH Zurich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science) Abstract: As our understanding improves, more observations become avail – able, and computational capacity increases, climate models continue to in – crease in complexity to synthesize all that knowledge. The hope is that as more and more processes are […]

Elisabeth Lloyd: Robustness of Climate models

  Elisabeth Lloyd, Indiana University, Bloomington March 05, 2015 Location: Western University, Stevenson Hall, Room 1145 3:30 pm Abstract:  Both climate scientists and philosophers have been working hard to understand how the huge multidimensional global climate models can be tested and confirmed.  The convergence of multiple climate models on a single outcome or result has […]

Nathaniel Bergman: Extreme Floods and Short-Term Hydroclimatological Fluctuations in the Hyper-Arid Dead Sea Region, Israel

  Nathaniel Bergman* , Noam Greenbaum and Uri Schwartz ( * University of Western Ontario) Title: Extreme Floods and Short-Term Hydroclimatological Fluctuations in the Hyper-Arid Dead Sea Region, Israel The autumn Active Red Sea Trough (ARST) rainstorm in the southern Dead Sea region on 29 October 2004 was documented using calibrated radar images, some rainfall […]

Jon Lawhead: Multi­Scale Modeling and Pluralism in Climate Systems

Jon Lawhead (University of Southern California)   Title:Multi­Scale Modeling and Pluralism in Climate Systems   The global climate is a paradigmatic complex system, and so exhibits interesting behavioral regularities at many different spatio­temporal scales. Moreover, these patterns are mutually constraining: the presence of a stable behavioral regularity at one scale can influence the structure of stable behavioral […]