Project Description

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Sameera Singh

RESEARCH AREAS:

  • Philosophy of Mind

  • Philosophy of Science

  • Philosophy of Psychology

CONTACT:

SAMEERA SINGH

M.A. Student;
Department of Philosophy, Western University

Sameera is an MA student in Philosophy at Western University. She completed her undergraduate degree at McMaster University with a combined honours in Philosophy and Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour (PNB). She has conducted empirical research in several psychology labs investigating questions in attention, perception, visual cognition, and social cognition. Her philosophical interests span the philosophy of mind, philosophy of cognitive science, and philosophy of psychology. She is also interested in the history of philosophy (especially early modern thinkers), philosophy of medicine, and social epistemology.

Sameera is interested in studying levels of explanations in cognitive science, investigating questions such as: Is there is a privileged level of explanation in cognitive science? Should cognitive phenomena be explained at the neural level, functional level, or cultural/social level? How can we bridge the gap between mechanistic explanations and reductive approaches viable for empirical investigation? What level of explanation do we use to define cognitive phenomena? How can we have a cohesive understanding of the mind?  

 She is also working on questions in the philosophy of perception (arguing that visual illusions are not quite as illusory as we think they are) philosophy of memory (investigating how different levels of explanations of memory change how we view memory in clinical populations), and social epistemology (esp. of science). She is also passionate about history of philosophy especially early modern thinkers such as Spinoza, Hobbes, and Kant.

Articles 

  • Singh, S., Bianchi, L., Ashburner, M., & Risko, E.F. (in preparation) Time-compressed recorded lectures: Effects on comprehension, metacognition, and affect.  
  • Cochrane, B. A., Singh, S., & Pratt, J. (in revision).  Let’s end the debate: Saccade preparation does not produce Inhibition of Return.  Visual Cognition, VC-FA 126.19. 
  • Lapointe, S., Klausen, C., Singh, S., Morgan, B. Propst, A., Twomey, A., Todd, N., Camporese, P. (2021) Foundational Skills and What Humanists and Social Scientists Need to Know. The/La Collaborative, McMaster University. 2021. 

Conference Presentations 

  • Risko, E.F., Bianchi, L., Singh, S., Tran, S., Ashburner, M., Lu, C., Wilson, K. (2021 – July 16) Adventures in Understanding the Effective Design of Recorded Lectures [Conference Presentation]. McMaster Conference in Education and Cognition 2021. McMaster Univeristy, ON, Canada.  
  • Risko, E.F., Bianchi, L., Singh, S., Tran, S., Ashburner, M. (2021 – June 17) Adventures in Understanding the Effective Design of Recorded Lectures [Conference Presentation]. Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Science Annual Conference 2021. McGill University, QC, Canada.  
  • Singh, S., Bianchi, L., Ashburner, M., Risko,E.F. (2020 – October 30) Effect of speed watching video lectures on comprehension, metacognition, and affect [Conference Presentation]. Psychology Discovery Conference, University of Waterloo 2020. Waterloo, ON, Canada.  
  • Singh, S., Cochrane, B., Sun, H.J. (2019 – June 9) Failure to replicate Inhibition of Return through endogenous cues using an onset-detection task [Conference Presentation]. Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Science Annual Conference 2019. Waterloo, ON, Canada.  
  • Brown, K., Singh, S., deBie, A. (2017 – November 1) We All Have A Role To Play: Partnering With Students To Facilitate Accessibility in The Classroom [Conference Presentation]. Research on Teaching and Learning Conference. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. 
  • Fall 2017, Insight and Inquiry, McMaster University (TA)