Marie Gueguen 2017-09-13T14:18:17+00:00

Project Description

RESEARCH AREAS:

  • Philosophy of Physics

  • Philosophy of Science

  • Philosophy of Language

CONTACT:

MARIE GUEGUEN

Doctoral Student;
Department of Philosophy, Western University

Marie Gueguen is currently a PhD student in the philosophy department, beginning in 2015-2016. Her research interests are primarily in the history and philosophy of science, particularly the philosophical foundations of physics and cosmology. Marie is an Agrégée in Philosophy and received her Bachelor’s degree and her Master from the University of Rennes 1 (France). She also graduated from the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne with a Master in Logic and Philosophy of Science (LOPHISC) and took physics courses in the University of Paris 6-Jussieu.

In her MA research paper, Marie proposed to examine whether the strategy underlying the introduction of the Symmetrization Postulate in Quantum Mechanics could be helpful if it is applied to the issue of unitarily inequivalent representations in Quantum Field Theory. The problem of indiscernibility has been treated early on in the literature as the metaphysical issue of whether or not standard quantum mechanics allows for a particle ontology. Such an approach has not yet produced any satisfactory conclusion. To some extent, there is a similar problem in Quantum Field Theory. The issue of unitarily inequivalence has been treated from a metaphysical standpoint in recent literature, as also challenging the possibility of a particle ontology. In her dissertation, Marie argued that the issue of quantum indiscernibility has been more fruitfully addressed within physics itself. In physics, the role of the Symmetrization Postulate is to sort out physically relevant states on the basis of specific symmetry considerations. She suggested that the issue of unitarily inequivalence could well benefit from a similar treatment.

More recently, Marie has focused her attention on paraparticles, i.e., particles obeying intermediate statistics. She used paraparticles as a case study to show an alternative perspective on the notion of possibility in physics. Additionally, her study on paraparticles allowed her to explore the different meanings of physical equivalence and to consider what kind of evidence has been historically used in order to choose between two physically equivalent theories.

MA Thesis

Second Year thesis topic : Symmetries and quantum theories (University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Supervisor: M. Kistler and A. Barberousse, available here).

First Year Thesis Topic : Identity, Individuality and Indiscernibility in Quantum Mechanics (University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Supervisor : M. Kistler, available here).

Winter Term 2016 :
PHILOSOP 2010G 001 FW15, Philosophy of Food (TA), University of Western Ontario.

Fall term 2015:
PHILOSOP 2073F 001 FW15, Philosophy of Death (TA), University of Western Ontario.

Winter Term 2015:
Philosophy of Science (TA), University of Nantes.

Philosophical English (Lecturer), University of Nantes.